Contents

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Shotguns…trusty, great for hunting and home defense, and practically impossible to miss a target with…or are they? Daniel Horner, US Army Marksmanship Unit Shotguns are pretty good at hitting things with only a general sense of aim, but if you want to hit things consistently (or hit the right things), it doesn’t hurt to have a little extra help in the aim department. I’ve been a huge fan of shotguns for years, and one thing I have learned is that the sights on your shotgun are more important than you think. Unless looking like this much of a badass is more important than hitting your target, listen up.

9 Best Shotgun Sights: Iron, Ghost, Red Dot, Scope

9 Best Shotgun Sights: Iron, Ghost, Red Dot, ScopeTrending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Shotguns…trusty, great for hunting and home defense, and practically impossible to miss a target with…or are they? Daniel Horner, US Army Marksmanship Unit Shotguns are pretty good at hitting things with only a general sense of aim, but if you want to hit things consistently (or hit the right things), it doesn’t hurt to have a little extra help in the aim department. I’ve been a huge fan of shotguns for years, and one thing I have learned is that the sights on your shotgun are more important than you think. Unless looking like this much of a badass is more important than hitting your target, listen up. Let’s talk about that, as well as go over a multitude of the best options for shotgun sights. Table of Contents Loading... Why Do I Need Shotgun Sights? Modern shotgun ammo holds together well. 12ga Shotgun Shells, Opened (L to R: Bird, Buck, Slug) The idea that you can’t miss with a shotgun is one of the big myths about this weapon and it makes me cringe whenever I hear it. You got to aim the gun like any other, and that means using the sights. Most shotguns come with a simple bead sight. In general, there is nothing wrong with a bead sight. It works fine for buck/birdshot and out to 100 yards, it’s effective for slugs. It’s not perfect though. Like red dots? Boy, do we have good news for you… Beads are often quite small , and they can be difficult to see, especially in low light, or if you are in a hurry the bead can work, but they are not the end all be all for shotguns. Maverick 88 The majority of weapons can benefit from upgraded sights and the shotgun is no different. I’ve gathered a variety of both optics and sights that are well suited for shotguns of all types. I wanted to cover sporting use as well as defensive use. I also tried to accommodate a wide variety of different budgets. My collection of Remington 870 shotguns On top of that, I’ve also included options for the most popular styles of shotguns, as well as some that are a little more universal. I think there’s something for just about everyone here, so let’s get to it! Best Shotgun Sights Iron Sights The cool thing about shotguns is that iron sights are still a very valid way to use these guns. Optics are cool, but shotguns really don’t need them for the tasks most of us use a shotgun for. There are several shotgun sights out there that are much better than your standard bead sight. For shotguns, iron sights come in beads, open sights and ghost ring sights. Bead and open sights are easy and quick to use with shot. Ghost rings can be used with shot effectively but aren’t typically as fast but work well for slugs. Open sights are often a compromise that works okay with both. 1. Hi-Viz Snap-on Sight If you want an incredibly cheap and easy way to upgrade your shotgun’s bead is the Hi-Viz snap-on fiber optic front sight . There is no gunsmithing required to install this little device. It just snaps on the barrel and you are ready to roll. This Snap-On sight provides a very high visibility green or red fiber optic front sight. It’s much easier to pick up the front sight in all light conditions and allows you to quickly pick the dot up and put it on target. Easy to mount, easy to see. A design like this isn’t designed for high volume shooting. Shotgun barrels get hot and this may cause the polymer to heat up and stretch which may compromise its hold on the barrel. This is still a good choice for hunting and even home defense. Shotguns are not high-volume weapons and this issue is unlikely to come up in a standard home defense situation or when hunting deer, turkey, hogs, etc. Bird hunting may be another situation where you are shooting a ton of rounds at one time and this might be an issue. Hi-Viz Snap-on Sight 18 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 18 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing At this low cost, it’s a simple solution to a simple platform. Perfect for those on a tight budget using the always great Maverick 88 or 870 Express. This is a sight designed for 12, 20, and 16-gauge shotguns and it will only work with bare barrels. No vent ribs. 2. XS Big Dot Front Sight XS sights are well known for their big front sights designed for handguns. The idea is to improve your speed by providing you a much bigger, and much easier to see bead that just so happens to glow when the lights get low. XS took that same idea and applied it to shotguns. Now you see it, now you don’t. This single dot replaces your bead by being inserted over the bead. This system will work with some beads but includes a bead to replace yours if yours is too big or too small. The difficulty of installing will vary on your gun and the ability to remove the bead. With a Mossberg 590, I had zero issues unscrewing the front bead and installing this system. It has been on my gun for over a year without any issue. The XS sight is very easy to see and your eye will pick it up extremely fast. XS Big Dot Night Sights glow brightly. The XS Big Dot Sight has a tritium vial in the middle that glows very brightly and it’s easy to see in low light. The white ring is also easy on the eyes and works great for both low light and normal daylight conditions. It’s a solid front sight that acts like a bead on steroids. It’s affordable and will fit a variety of shotguns. Certainly, double-check the XS website and ensure your gun is covered. It’s a great investment for a home defense shotgun. XS Big "Dot Front Sight" 60 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 60 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing It is better suited for using shot than slugs. At long ranges, the large size of this front sight is going to make it hard to shoot slugs at smaller targets. 3. Williams Gun Sight Fire Sight Ghost Ring I didn’t want to leave my hunters behind and I know most sporting shotguns come with a ribbed barrel. That ribbed barrel just so happens to be an excellent base for sights. The Williams "Gun Sight Fire" Sights are a very handy set of sights if you have a vent rib shotgun. Williams Gun Sight Fire "Sight Ghost Ring" These sights attach to the vent rib and they work for most shotguns. Best of all they require zero gunsmithing to install. The front sight sits right behind your traditional bead and provides you a high visibility orange front sight. The rear sight is a ghost ring model that is flanked by two glowing green orbs for low light shootings. These sights are quick and easy to acquire and well suited for hunting deer, hogs, turkey, etc. Williams Gun Sight Fire Sight Ghost Ring 15 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 15 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing They are an excellent choice for slug guns and because they are easy to install and remove you can easily switch from deer season to bird season. Also, they are affordably priced. 4. Trijicon Night Sights Trijicon is the name in duty grade night sights, and duty optics, and basically anything that glows in the dark. Trijicon night sights are also made for shotguns! Well, they are made for Remington shotguns to include the 870, 1100, and 1187. Trijicon Night Sight 3-Dot rear sight These sights are not for everyone, and not for every 870. You’ll have to take it to a gunsmith for install. The receiver needs to be tapped for a rear sight and installed and the barrel will need to bead removed and the front sight permanently attached via welding. These sights are outstanding for long-range slug work, and precision buckshot work. The tritium vials glow brightly, and one is placed in the front sight and one on each side of the ghost ring. It’s perfect for home defense, including night time work. These sights are explicitly made for defensive and duty use and are duty grade sights. Trijicon is the professional’s choice for a reason. These are serious sights for serious work, and I’ll say it again aren’t for everyone. Trijicon 3 Dot Front And Ghost Ring Rear Night Sight Set 94 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 94 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing However, if you want a bombproof, well-proven design for defensive and combative use these sights are an excellent go-to option. 5. XS Ghost Rings If you like the idea of XS sights, but what something more precise, then they have you covered–at least the Remington 870 and Mossberg 500. The XS Ghost Ring sights are unique because they allow you to add a standard front sight and rear ghost ring relatively easily. It’s most easy on the Mossberg 500 and 590. XS Ghost Ring sights (via The Loadout Room ) The Mossberg 500 series come tapped from the factory and this makes it easy to install the rear sight. Remington 870s are not tapped in most models and must be tapped to install the rear rail and sight. The front sight clamps to the end of the barrel and is tightened via a set of screws. XS Ghost Ring MB-1002-4 (Mossberg) 182 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 182 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing As long as your receiver is tapped you can install this system at home with ease. These sights make reaching out with slugs more precise than a standard shotgun bead. What I also like is the fact that the rear ghost sight is very wide. What you could see… in theory. This allows you to keep a wide field of view and still quickly acquire a target and disperse with standard buckshot–which means a shotgun remains a shotgun. Because this system is from XS you can assume that the front sight is easy to see and is a night sight. The front sight has a white strip and in the center is a tritium vial that glows for low light performance. The entire site system is made from aluminum and is matte black. The entire system is well thought out and well-executed. XS Ghost Ring RE-4001R-4 (Remington) 182 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 182 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing I love the fact you can install these sights at home and get a set of Ghost ring sights on your shotgun. They are admittedly expensive, but they are a high-quality set of shotgun sights. What’s your take? Readers' Ratings 4.98/5 (336) Your Rating? Red Dots As close-range weapons, shotguns can be easily equipped with a red dot and be ultra-effective. Red dots are not necessary on shotguns but can make you faster and would allow you to easily use both slugs and shot. Red dots can make it a whole lot easier to get on target with your shotgun. They aren’t limited to a load. If you are going to be using both slugs and shot, then you should zero the dot to slugs. Your use of shot at close range will still be incredibly effective. The dot will be zeroed enough for dropping buckshot into a target accurately enough to take it down. Red dots are slick and fast and there are two I like for shotguns. 6. Burris FastFire 3 The Burris FastFire 3 is a great mini red dot for a few reasons and is great on shotguns for a number of other reasons. First, it is small and light and easy to use. It’s rugged, dependable, and affordable for what you are getting. Burris Fastfire 3 This red dot has three intensity settings and an auto setting that will adapt the reticle to the light around you. The auto setting is legit and does adapt quickly to the light around you. It’s also a pretty solid unit and mine has been banged around a lot and it still keeps going. The FastFire 3 comes in 3 or 8 MOA, and to me, the 8 MOA is better for shotguns, but the 3 itself isn’t bad either. Fastfire 3 in AR Mount You can find it with a Picatinny mount as well as a hood to protect the optic. It’s got a top-loading battery, one-button controls, and is very lightweight. A big reason I love it is the Speed Bead mounting system. This mounts between the stock and the receiver and the red dot replaces your bead. This also allows you to mount the optic to guns without needing to tap them for an optics rail. Burris FastFire 3 219 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 219 at Amazon Compare prices (3 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) OpticsPlanet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing It also positions the optic far enough down that it is super low profile and easy to use with a traditional shotgun sight. 7. Eotech EXPS2 The Eotech offers shotguns a very interesting design for shotguns, I specifically like the Eotech EXPS2 for shotguns. Eotech optics provide a combination of features that compliment shotguns very well. Let’s explain some of these features. EOTech EXPS2-0 Side First, the square-shaped design encourages two eyes opened shooting, which is perfect for a shotgun. It gives you a wide field of view that is a must for close-quarters shooting. You have time to miss seeing your target. Next, the traditional reticle is perfect for shotguns and works well for both slugs and buckshot. The 68 MOA ring and 1 MOA red dot combination are very versatile. You should pattern your shotgun for different distances and you should know the distance you can engage with a shotgun. EOTech EXPS2-0 Reticle With that in mind, the shotgun rules in close quarters use and the big red 68 MOA circle makes it easy to put that big circle on the target and pull the trigger. When it comes down to speed the big circle makes a big difference. The 1 MOA dot can be zeroed for slugs and be quite precise for hunting or just long-range engagements in general. This combination is an excellent choice if you want an optic that can do a little bit of it all. Eotech EXPS2 484 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 484 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing The EXPS2 model is smaller, lighter, and needs only 1 inch of rail to mount. It has 20 brightness settings and a 10-year warranty. Plus, it handles shotgun recoil very well. 8. Crimson Trace Laser Saddle One of the most fun I’ve had at SHOT shows range day was at the Crimson Trace booth. Their new optics were outstanding, but the reason I had so much fun at the booth was the Laser Saddle for shotguns. They had one mounted on a Shockwave and it was a literal blast. The Laser Saddle fits on the receiver of a Mossberg 500 or 590 series shotgun and gives you an ultra-bright laser sight that allows you to fire from the hip accurately. Its absurdly low profile and very bright. This was 11 Am in the desert on a cloudless day, it was bright outside, but I can still see and use the laser. "Crimson Trace Laser" Saddle diagram This red dot has ambidextrous on-off switches, as well as a master switch to shut it down. It’s a shotgun designed laser that I love. Especially for those non-NFA firearms like the Shockwave and TAC-14. Crimson Trace Laser Saddle 159 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 159 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing It adds hardly any bulk to the design and is easy to use in a firing position without compromising your positioning. Not to mention, it’s ultra-bright and gives you a sure shot and a solid idea of where you are aiming. Variable Slug Scope Slug guns are quite popular in states where it’s very flat and rifles are prohibited. A slug gun is technically a shotgun but is designed with a rifled barrel to accurately shoot a slug. These guns shoot pretty far so a variable scope is a great addition to a slug gun. 12ga Slugs 9. Bushnell Trophy Shotgun Scope Bushnell makes affordable optics that often punch above their weight when it comes to quality. Slug guns offer more range than shotguns, but not much beyond 200 yards. You won’t need a crazy level of magnification, and the Bushnell "Trophy Shotgun Scope" is a 1.75-4x power compact optic designed for slug guns. Bushnell Trophy Scope The Trophy Shotgun scope has their rain guard HD which makes it easy to aim in wet conditions. The Scope uses a simple circle X reticle that is far from complicated and well suited for short-range slug gun shooting. The Shotgun scope has a fast-focus eyepiece, and this makes it quick to go from shoulder to shoot. The Shotgun scope features fully-multicoated optics, ¼ MOA adjustments, and its backed with a Lifetime Warranty. Bushnell Trophy Shotgun Scope 130 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 130 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing This is a purpose-built scope and that’s why I appreciate it for a slug gun. Plus, the low price and excellent warranty are great selling points. Parting Shots Never underestimate the need to aim with a shotgun and the need for good sights. With that being said let me know what you like and what kind of shotgun sight you use? Did your favorites make our list? Tell us all about it in the comments below! While you’re here, why not check out the Best Shotguns for Home Defense ?

Gun Review: Shooting the Browning Maxus

Gun Review: Shooting the Browning Maxus

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d5fd1959_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d5fd1959_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Created by duck hunters for duck hunters, the Browning Maxus is big on reliability, accuracy and power. The very first sentence in the 2010 Browning catalog in reference to the company’s latest autoloading shotgun, the Maxus, is as follows – “The Browning Maxus – Maximum Reliability.” From experience, those five words certainly do say it all. My first date with the Maxus was in Alberta in late 2008. Our group had, if memory serves me right, five of the new guns – a number which I believe represented, at that time, the whole of the population. Our host for the hunt, Browning’s Scott Grange, sheep-dogged his tiny stockpile of innovation with more intensity than did Golem guard The Ring. However, at the end of our three-day stint north of Edmonton, there wasn’t a one of us writers who wasn’t plotting some way to sneak one of the Maxus’ back into The States. Yes, they’re that good. A year later, Grange allowed me four days on the Great Salt Lake behind the recoil pad of a Plain Jane black-and-synthetic Maxus. Goldeneyes, pintails, mallards, widgeon, grey ducks, and bluebills all fell to the gun; so, too, did my first tundra swan and first drake cinnamon teal. This time, the now year-old SKU was put through a brutal battery of field tests, including freezing cold temperatures, exposure to saltwater, and absolutely no maintenance whatsoever, and emerged with a report card sporting all As. Related GunDigest Articles Modern Shooter: At H&H Precision Rifles' Shooting School Tactical Shotgun: Mossberg Flex Review Gun Digest's Five Best Posts on Gun Buying and Gun Selling The catalog write-up goes on to list what Browning describes as the Maxus’ “innovative technologies.” Certainly, so-called such cutting edge technology can be nice and, at times, even useful. However, ‘tis often the case where one man’s innovation is another man’s gingerbread – or rather, fluff disguised as innovation. Fortunately, the latter is not case with the Maxus. Technically Speaking To me, the Maxus is without question the spawn of a waterfowler’s collective, a duck gun if there ever was a duck gun. A goose gun, too. In its purest form, the piece is a 3.5-inch gas-operated semi-automatic 12-bore; but it is more than that. The Maxus’ efficiency begins where it should, with a trio of elements designed to enhance the gun’s on-target performance. Browning has combined their already-existing Invector-Plus choke system, with a lengthened (2.5-inch) forcing cone and back-bored barrel – the result being minimal shot deformation, and vastly improved pattern density, consistency, and uniformity. These attributes are particularly noticeable when using larger non-toxic pellet sizes, and especially true in the case of steel shot. Function for the Maxus is via what Browning calls their Power Drive System. Elementally, it’s a port-and-piston design; however, oversized ports quickly bleed off excess gas with heavy loads, while a 20-percent longer piston stroke allows the piece to operate smoothly and reliably with the light stuff. The unit itself is, for all intents and purposes, uniquely sealed, thus helping keep what my father always referred to as “mud, muck and corruption” out of the inner workings. Recoil with the Maxus has been greatly reduced – An 18 percent reduction, as compared with other modern autoloaders – thanks to a combination of the "Power Drive System" , back-boring, and a space-age recoil pad, complete with what’s being deemed Inflex Technology.

Self-Defense: Developing A Combat Mindset

Self-Defense: Developing A Combat Mindset

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d13dbeb3_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d13dbeb3_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Self-defense is a fight for your life. The only way to ensure you come out on top is preparation. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! Have you ever heard of having a combat mindset? Let me give you the best advice I can to help you save your life. Read, consume and absorb Principles of Personal Defense . Jeff Cooper, the founder of Gunsite, wrote this book and it costs less than 20 rounds of good defensive handgun ammunition . For those who will not take my advice or whose wallets are as tight as a barrel bushing on a 1911 — with apologies to Col. Cooper — I’ll summarize. Related GunDigest Articles 7 Hot New Handguns For Everyday Carry The .22 LR For Self Defense: Good, Bad Or Crazy? Concealed Carry: Concealing A Single-Action Revolver Alertness: Be aware, be ready; bad things can happen at any time. Live by the Gunsite (Cooper) Color Code. Decisiveness: Counterattack now! Do not tarry . To ponder is to perish. Aggressiveness: Go at it like you mean it. Speed: Be sudden, be quick. Be first. Coolness: Keep your wits. Don’t lose control of your emotions. Ruthlessness: Strike with all your strength for every blow. Shoot them to the ground. Surprise: Do not wilt, do not cower, and don’t be predictable. Fight back. This, in brief, is the mindset you must have for self-defense. An acquaintance believes in luck, and if it did exist it would be a wonderful thing to believe in. But luck seems to have a way of showing up at random. And, randomness, while it might be acceptable in sports, love and hunting, is not acceptable in a self-defense situation — when your life is on the line. As it’s been said, luck is when opportunity meets preparation. Prepare your mind — get the combat mindset — and when opportunity or bad timing puts your life on the line , you’ll be lucky.

[Hands-On Review] Larry Vickers Master Class 1911: Combat Focused

[Hands-On Review] Larry Vickers Master Class 1911: Combat Focused

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s How do you make a good 1911? That’s a good question, and one I sadly can’t answer. I’m in no way a 1911 expert or even an aficionado. I’m merely a guy who thinks it’s a neat platform. Vickers Master Class 1911 My own experiences are more or less marred by cheaper 1911s and in general, those experiences lead me to the plastic fantastic that rule the modern handgun market. I couldn’t find a normal 1911 platform that captured me. Double stacks are fun, I also like the longer slide 10mm variants, but your average everyday 1911 never did anything for me. Until now. Vicker Master Class (7) You see, while I don’t know what makes a 1911 good there are people that do. These people include industry titans like Larry Vickers, major manufacturers like Springfield Armory, and custom shops like Wilson Combat. These guys know 1911s, and it turns out when they all get together some magic can happen. Table of Contents Loading... The Who: Springfield, Larry Vickers, and Wilson Combat Springfield Armory is a major manufacturer of 1911s, and famously provided 1911s to the FBI’s Elite Hostage Rescue Team (and even a limited number to the USMC’s Force Recon Operators). Springfield Armory Logo They have the experience and know-how to manufacture quality 1911s. Larry Vickers is a major figure in firearms media today, but way back when he served as a Delta Operator, was a Green Beret, and served under HK advising on guns like the 416 and HK 45. He’s also a firearms instructor and a 1911 expert. Larry Vickers Outside of firearms classes, he even teaches classes on how to turn a box of parts into a functioning weapon. He even knows a thing or two about the Browning Warhorse. Wilson Combat is a custom firearm manufacturer who made their name with the 1911 platform. While they extended out to the Beretta and even Glock and P320s, their heart and soul is the 1911 game. Wilson Combat Logo They make some fantastic guns, but also parts, pieces, and more. This makes them a natural choice when choosing off the shelf 1911 upgrades. When you combine these three what you get is the Vickers Tactical Master Class 1911 –and it’s one helluva gun. "Vickers Tactical Master" Class 1911 1495 at Springfield Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1495 at Springfield Armory Prices accurate at time of writing Combative Design 1911s are a versatile platform for just about anything you could want in a gun–hunting, competition, and defensive use. The Vickers Tactical Master Class 1911 is designed for the latter of those three. Ready to win a fight! It’s a handgun designed with combatives in mind. The Master Class is most certainly a gun designed with a mission. From the sights to the trigger and beyond, the gun is modernized and perfected for combat. The Vickers Tactical Master Class is, at its heart, a classic 1911. It’s a .45 ACP model; with a 5-inch barrel and G.I. style recoil system. It’s simple, but it works–and when it comes to reliability, often simple is better. Breaking It Down: The Details Where this gun differs from your plain old 1911 is in the features, which are also what pushes the gun to a combative design. The first notable features are the Wilson Combat safety and hammer. The hammer is a Wilson Stainless Steel Commander hammer . The smaller commander hammer pokes less for concealed carry and is lighter weight. The Wilson Combat Commander Hammer This lighter hammer helps with a better trigger pull. The safety is a single-sided safety with an extended shelf. The shelf is very easy to reach and accessible with a natural grip on the gun. The beavertail is also extended and ensures you can get a nice and high grip on the gun. A high grip translates to more control over the Vickers Tactical Master Class. The sights are perfect for combat. The rear sight is a Vickers Elite blacked-out rear sight and the front is a high visibility day and night sight. It’s quick to acquire and easy to get on target. That grip tho The grip redefines the term aggressive. The G10 grip panels have the custom LAV logo, but more importantly, they are very roughly textured. The same goes for the front and backstrap of the gun. The texturing is stupid aggressive, but it makes sure the gun stays put. The magazines are also Wilson Combat mags with Vickers metal base plates. The base plates are pyramid-like in design and they serve three purposes. Vickers Master Class magazine First, the extra weight makes sure the magazines drop free when empty every single time. The metal base plates allow the magazine to hit the ground over and over without durability worries. Wilson Combat 1911 Elite Tactical Vickers Duty .45 ACP 8-Round Magazine 54 at GunMag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 54 at GunMag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing Lastly, the long pyramid style design allows the user to grip the baseplate and rip the magazine from the gun should you run into a complicated malfunction. "Vickers Master Class" with a spare mag The Vickers Tactical Master Class is also outfitted with a match grade 5-inch stainless steel barrel and a match-grade trigger with a medium weight. Both the frame and slide are the superior forged steel designs. It’s finished with Springfield Armory Black T, which looks excellent if you like black guns and is rather tough. The slide serrations are a woven design that clings to the fingers but doesn’t rub your hands raw. Now you know all about it, but how does it handle? Testing Ammo Used As of this writing, the COVID-19 has wiped out a lot of my local ammo spots and online prices have risen to meet the demand. I typically like a variety of ammo to test a gun out, but for now, my only supply is Winchester White 230 grain FMJs . So… sorry, I guess. Hopefully things will change soon! Winchester White 230gr FMJ .45 ACP 21 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 21 at Lucky Gunner Compare prices (2 found) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Range Time The best time is range time and shooting the Vickers Tactical Master Class is a lot of fun. I can get why the 1911 guys are so hardcore about their guns. They are rather pleasant to shoot. So dang sexy. The trigger, the sights, the grip, and controls are still classic 1911 like and that means the ergonomics are spot on. Like any other 1911, everything is easy to reach and access. Most noticeably the safety is very easy to access and your thumb sits on the shelf naturally. The recoil is the mild thump the .45 ACP is known for. It’s far from snappy or uncomfortable. Accuracy The accuracy of the gun is absolutely outstanding . It’s outfitted with all the necessary goods to ensure it’s an accurate blaster. From the match-grade trigger and barrel to the single-action design and excellent sights, this gun can’t help but be laser-like. These questions haunt us. Accuracy can be judged in two different ways, slow, traditional shooting, and the more practical up close and fast shooting. Obviously, we had to try out both! At a Distance At 50 yards I can ring a 10-inch rifle gong over and over and over and it’s a blast. Keep in mind this is a traditional slow fire setup where I took the time to ensure each shot was as perfect as it could be. Boooonnggggggg! At 25 yards accurate and precise headshots were easy to do. Not just perfect slow fire, but from the low ready and in under 1.5 seconds. This isn’t just a matter of luck, but a product of the gun’s design and its features. Up Close and Fast For a combative handgun, up close and personal is its domain. The Vickers Tactical Master Class excels when things get close and fast . To test how a gun handles up close and personal I put it against a timer and conducted several different drills. The first drill I ran was the iHack, which is a modified Hackathorn Headshot standards drill that involves three small targets, nine rounds, and three runs. On my very first try, I scored a 9 out of 9 within the time limit. Typically it takes me a few runs to warm up and perfect the drill so I was tickled when I ran 100% the first time. I shot the iHack three more times and only dropped one round between all four runs. The drill stresses proper shot placement on a small target, but to be accurate and fast you have to be able to track your sights. The bright front sight and the blacked-out rear sight create a stark contrast that makes it easy to follow the front sight. This is what makes the drill so much easier to do. Honestly, this makes me want to mimic this sight setup on my P365 EDC gun. Like, dang. Other drills included fun ones like the Collateral drill, named from the film. This involves drawing and shooting one target twice in the chest and then utilizing a failure to stop drill on the second target. Just look at it! I carried my Vickers Tactical Master Class in a Crossbreed rig for the drill. The end result was fun but challenging. I passed, maybe not on the first try, but after a couple of practice runs, I split wigs like Tom Cruise. Sight tracking and cadence were important here, as was control. The aggressively textured grip and high and long beavertail give you an excellent degree of control over the gun. The "Tactical Master Class" Class never tries to wiggle its way out of your hand, even when you are passing out double taps. Zombieland knows what’s good. I also found myself liking the magazine design quite a bit. The Vickers baseplates are perfect and when reloading they offer a very sure grip on the magazine. You’ll have no issues retrieving them from your magazine pouch, even if it’s an IWB design. This is a very fun gun to shoot. Part of the fun is the fact it does a lot of the work for you when it comes to shooting well. I appreciate that and the ego boost it gives me. Concealability The Tactical Master Class Class is a full-sized 1911 that pulls no punches. At well over 40 ounces fully loaded it may feel like a boat anchor with the wrong belt and holster. In the Crossbreed Hybrid ST2 it felt supported and comfortable to me. Crossbreed Hybrid ST2 70 at CrossBreed Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 70 at CrossBreed Prices accurate at time of writing The gun is a full size cannon so the challenges of concealing it are very apparent. The good news its the 1911 design is inherently thin and this does make it a bit more comfortable to carry and to conceal. It’s not my first choice for concealed carry, but I wouldn’t feel under armed with it. What I Would Change There has to be a touch of narcissism in me to assume I know better than Larry Vickers, Springfield Armory, and Wilson Combat when it comes to 1911s. That being said I would make one change. Yes, my ego is this big. I’d prefer a railed model. A light rail is a must-have for me, and on a full-sized gun, I don’t see a reason why I wouldn’t want one. I’d prefer the option to carry a WML. (Check out the Best Pistol Lights for all your WML-supporting guns!) By the Numbers Reliability 5/5 No issues at all throughout 600 rounds. I have yet to clean the gun, or even add lube. The majority of these rounds were fired in a single day without much of a break. The Tactical Master Class Class was designed for combat and if a gun isn’t reliable it hardly has a place in a combative realm. Accuracy 4/5 As far as handguns go it’s hard to beat a 1911. The excellent single-action trigger is even more refined in the Master Class which leads to a very accurate firearm. Add in an excellent set of sights, and a match grade barrel and you get a gun that’s hard to beat. Hard, but not impossible. Running the Master Class side by side with the Springfield TRP Operator Longslide showed that a little extra barrel goes a long way. Ergonomics 5/5 It’s a 1911. The gun defines excellent ergonomics. It scores 5 out of 5 easily. Hell, it’s one of the few guns in which my fat thumbs don’t pin down the slide lock. Looks 5/5 As much as I was never a fan of the 1911 I can’t deny it’s not one of the best looking guns to ever exist. The clean lines and design speak for themselves. Add in the Black T finish and you have a refined and professional looking firearm. Customization 4/5 A 1911 can be customized almost any which way you want it to be. You can slap on any arrangement of parts so the market is wide open. I knocked a point off because while I can swap the controls and externals I can’t easily add a light. Bang For Your Buck 3/5 Any gun that costs more than a thousand bucks in a world where you can get world-class reliability and function from 500 dollar polymer pistol is a tough sell. Although, as far as semi-custom 1911s go, this is a rather affordable model and the price will likely be lower than the 1,500 dollar MSRP. Overall 4/5 The Tactical Master Class Class 1911 is a very well made and well-designed pistol that’s full of features that push a centennial forward. It’s accurate, reliable, and a helluva lot of fun to shoot. Conclusion The Tactical Master Class Class is a very fine weapon and it’s given me a little more insight into the realm of 1911 guys and their beloved handgun. It gets everything right at a decent price even if it doesn’t have a rail. Larry Vickers has a resume that’s tough to beat and his knowledge and appreciation of the 1911 handgun certainly show through here. Tactical Master Class Class 1911 1495 at Springfield Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1495 at Springfield Armory Prices accurate at time of writing I may not be a convert yet, but I can definitely appreciate just why 1911s are so well loved. What say you? Are you a 1911 fan? If so does this gun appeal to you? If you aren’t a 1911 fan what do you think? Let me know below. And hey, while you’re here, why not check out the Best 1911s for Your Money ! 1911s with Lights & Lasers

5 Easy Steps On How To Clean A Gun (2020)

Mechanical devices demand regular and proper maintenance.  This certainly includes all firearms which do require a good cleaning and lubrication after use to keep their operational performance at a peak for a survival scenario. Generally, though, regular maintenance does not imply that a firearm needs to be disassembled to the last screw and spring in order to clean it.  Any firearm can get a basic fundamental cleaning in five quick steps. Quick Navigation How To Clean a Gun: All You Need to Know 1. Unload and Remove Bolt 2. Swab Bore 3. Scrub Bore 4. Run Bore with Patches 5. Apply Light Lubrication How To Clean a Gun: All You Need to Know 1. Unload and Remove Bolt Before cleaning any gun, open the action to make sure it is unloaded, and then read the owner’s manual for specific gun model instructions.  Remove clips or magazines.  Take out the bolt in a rifle, or lock open the action of a semi-auto rifle, shotgun, or pistol.  Brush with solvent, clean, dry off, and lightly lube the bolt.  Make sure you brush the extractor and/or ejector as well. 2. Swab Bore Set the cleaned bolt aside and working from the breech or chamber end only run a cleaning rod with attached bronze brush soaked in gun solvent down the barrel and out the muzzle.  Repeat this same action if the barrel is particularly dirty.  Let it sit for 10-15 minutes.  This allows the solvent to dissolve and soften bullet jacket material, lead, and powder fowling. Hoppe's Elite Gun Cleaner Spray Bottle, 8 Ounces Hoppes Elite gun Cleaner meets the demands of professional shooters, military and law enforcement by... Penetrates down to the steel's molecular pores, removing carbon, lead, and most copper fouling See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 08:48 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA 3. Scrub Bore After the solvent soak, run the solvent soaked bronze brush down the barrel again several times to loosen the gunk in the barrel.  Purists would say to unscrew the brush at the muzzle at each stroke of the cleaning rod rather than pulling it back up and out the chamber.  If you are a professional target shooter, this extra effort might make a difference, however for the average everyday deer rifle or .22 LR, this is not necessary.  You make that judgment for your gun especially if the application is law enforcement or security or the like. After ten or so runs of the brush, I do recommend next running a cloth patch down the bore to push any excess carbon out the muzzle. In this case do not pull the patch back out.  Take it off the rod, put on a clean one, and then pull the rod back out the chamber end.  Repeat again with the brush scrubbing.  As a rule of thumb on most hunting guns running the brush 25 times should do the job. 4. Run Bore with Patches Next run several solvent soaked patches down the barrel and out the muzzle end.  Replace each time with a clean patch, pull back up, and replace patch again. Do this until you are satisfied with the relative cleanliness of the patch. They may never come out completely white, but if they come out black, with shades of blue and green, then keep cleaning. Solvent can turn a lot of barrel fowling bluish or green. If this continues, you may need to soak the barrel again, rest it, and then brush again. It all depends on how many rounds were shot since the last cleaning.  If you deer hunted and shot the gun a half dozen times in a season that is of course much different than running 500 rounds through a .22 rimfire rifle, or a .223 AR rifle on the shooting range or a 9mm handgun doing police qualification shooting. Another great tool for cleaning the bore of your rifle or pistol is Hoppe's Bore Snake .  Here is a quick video product review of the Bore Snake.  I own a few of these (Joel) and had success using them. 5. "Apply Light Lubrication" Contrary to popular belief guns do not perform well swimming in oil. After all the swabbing and scrubbing, the barrel just needs a light coat of rust prevention oil as does the bolt. Use a clean soft cotton cloth with oil to wipe down all the metal surfaces of the gun.  A very little on the wood stock does not hurt it.  Don’t overdo oil. I do this final step wearing those $1 brown cotton gloves to keep fingerprints from ending up on the metal before storage. As to storage, do not put any firearm in any kind of a sealed case, either fabric or plastic for long term.  If you do, add a packet of moisture desiccant in the case, otherwise, just prop the gun up safely locked in a closet or secure area.  Ammo should be kept in a place separate from guns. Are there other steps that could be added?  Sure.  Use a clean toothbrush to dust in the juncture of the barrel where fitted to the stock.  Brush off sights, mounts, scope metal, too.  Clean optical lenses like any high quality glass.   Brush around the trigger area.  Clean the clip or magazine and oil lightly.  Brush up into the magazine insert cavity below the action.  Brush off the butt plate that usually ends up in the dirt. There you have completed a basic gun cleaning to prepare for a survival situation.  Be sure to check the gun ever so often to make sure no rusting has slipped up on the metal surfaces.  It is also a good idea before shooting your gun again to run a dry patch down the barrel to clean out any left over oil or dust.   If you continue to maintain your guns after each use, they will be ready when you need them. Best Gun Cleaning Kits You also buy ready-to-go cleaning kits to make this process easier. Here are our most recommended kits: Preview Product Rating GLORYFIRE Universal Gun Cleaning Kit Hunting Rifle Handgun Shot Gun... No ratings yet See Price on Amazon Otis Technologies FG-750 Cleaning System, Tactical, Clam Package No ratings yet See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 04:28 / Affiliate links / Images from "Amazon Product Advertising" API Photos by: Dr. Woods, Chris Vesely , US Navy Other interesting articles: How To Clean and Eat Skunk Glock – Ultimate Survival Pistol in 2020 PDW – Do You Really Need One? 2020 Debate KEL-TEC KSG: Survival Gun Review for 2020

New From SIRT Pocket Pistol Shot Show

Sirt training pistols are an awesome and safe way to train without your firearm. When you pull the trigger a laser shoots and lets you know where you are hitting and where you are missing. It’s an excellent dry fire and a painless force on force tool. It can be used for a wide variety of different training applications and is 100% safe. The newest model is the Sirt pocket pistol. The standard Sirt pistol was basically a full sized Glock lookalike. It was effective and worked, but for concealed carry, it was big for most people. Using a training device that matches your actual weapon can be incredibly valuable. This is where the Sirt pocket pistol comes in. With most people carrying a small, subcompact single stack weapon the frame and size of the full-size Glock Sirt just doesn’t mesh. Smaller guns have a shorter sight radius and smaller grips, which make them harder to shoot. Training with the Sirt pocket pistol to replicate your actual pistol will give you a better and more effective training experience. Use Discount Code “ArmsGuide” (not case sensitive) and get 10% off your new SIRT https://nextleveltraining.com/ Sirt Pocket Pistol The Sirt pocket pistol was lightweight but was an accurate replica of most pocket pistols out there. The trigger pull is somewhat long, like a DAO trigger, and the sight radius is of course, short. It is certainly a quality piece of gear, and I’m looking forward to seeing it when it hits shelves. Check Sirt out here.

Summary

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Shotguns…trusty, great for hunting and home defense, and practically impossible to miss a target with…or are they? Daniel Horner, US Army Marksmanship Unit Shotguns are pretty good at hitting things with only a general sense of aim, but if you want to hit things consistently (or hit the right things), it doesn’t hurt to have a little extra help in the aim department. I’ve been a huge fan of shotguns for years, and one thing I have learned is that the sights on your shotgun are more important than you think. Unless looking like this much of a badass is more important than hitting your target, listen up.